INDIGENOUS

COUNTERCULTUREFeaturedINDIGENOUSLOCALS / June 2016

“DORA, THE STYLE EXPLORER”: A DOCUMENTARY SERIES ABOUT FASHION & STYLE AROUND THE WORLD

 
Video by Sophie Pinchetti and Dora Moutot
Text by Sophie Pinchetti and Dora Moutot
Photo by Sophie Pinchetti

 

A year and a half ago, The Other began a project for a documentary series on contemporary and traditional dress in emerging countries entitled:

“Dora, The Style Explorer / Fashion Without Borders”

We very much wanted to translate the spirit of The OTHER into a video format.

Our concept: discover a new country through its dress culture in each episode.

 

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Photography by Tom Morgan
INDIGENOUSLOCALS / July 2015

HIGH LIFE TAILORED, GHANA’S KENTE CLOTH REVISITED

Photography by Tom Morgan
Text by Dora Moutot

Do you know what people wear in Ghana?

The traditional fabric of Ghana is known as Kente (no, not all of Africa wears wax prints!). It is made from cotton and silk, and if we’re telling you about Kente, that’s because we’re crazy for its geometric patterns interwoven as bold colourful panels! Celebrating the same spirit as The OTHER, the young fashion brand High Life Tailored is having fun modernising this traditional fabric.

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Photography by Joël Tettamanti
INDIGENOUSLOCALS / March 2015

THE BASOTHO BLANKET, A STYLE SIGNATURE IN LESOTHO

Photography by Joël Tettamanti
Text by Sophie Pinchetti

In the highlands of the Kingdom of Lesotho, a place often referred to as the “roof of Africa”, the Basotho blanket rules style. Effortless and chic, this rustic woollen garment is named after its people - the Basotho or Sotho, who settled in Lesotho around the 16th century and are one of the major ethnic groups within South Africa. Both beautiful and functional, the Basotho blanket is popular amongst all classes of society – from miners and herdsmen to the King and Queen of Lesotho.

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Photography by Eric Lafforgue
FeaturedINDIGENOUSLOCALS / July 2014

TRIBES OF THE OMO VALLEY: A STYLE IN BETWEEN TRADITIONS AND MODERNITY

Photography by Eric Lafforgue
Text by Dora Moutot

Ethiopia’s Omo Valley is that part of the world where every “adventurer of style” dreams of going. Located in southern Ethiopia, the Omo Valley is one of those few places in the world that is still home to many tribal peoples, whose population is about 200,000 in this region. French photographer Eric Lafforgue (National Geographic, Lonely Planet, etc) has travelled there several times and photographed beautiful and colorful portraits of the tribes of the Omo Valley, where tribal styles sometimes meet surprising accents of modernity.

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The Other_Brazilian Police Eviction of Indigenous Community Brazili Rio de Janeiro_13_banner
INDIGENOUSLOCALS / May 2014

ALDEIA MARACANÃ: A SYMBOL OF BRAZIL’S INDIGENOUS STRUGGLE

Photography by Felipe DanaChristophe Simon, Vanderlei Almeida and Pilar Olivares, Sergio Moraes
Text by Sophie Pinchetti

In the heart of Rio de Janeiro, one building stands as a beacon of hope in the struggle of Brazilian Indians: Aldeia Maracanã. Situated to the nearby Maracana stadium that now plays host to the World Cup, this colonial mansion was once home to the Museum of the Indian People in Brazil. Today, it is barricaded up, following the Brazilian police’s brutal eviction in 2013 of the indigenous community who had been residing in the premises and infused life into the place. It seems as though Brazil’s first peoples are not welcome to the World Cup.
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INDIGENOUS /

THE VANISHING TATTOOS OF THE KALINGA TRIBESWOMEN

Photography by Jake Verzosa
Text by Sophie Pinchetti

If you travel the world in the search of the rarest tattoos, you will inevitably arrive here: deep in the misty Cordillera mountains of the northern Philippines. This is the birthplace of the Kalinga headhunter’s tattoo and home to the Kalinga tribe. Over hundreds of years, the art of tattooing has played an essential part of their culture. Still proudly worn by the elder generations of Kalinga men and women, today, this ancestral tattoo is now on the brink of extinction.
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